The Zoo is open! 
All guests, including Zoo members, must now reserve free, timed tickets prior to visiting.

Review the Zoo’s reopening guidelines and make a reservation

When you are ready to visit, we're more than ready for you! Until then we are happy to continue to #BringTheStlZooToYou for you stay connected to your Zoo. 

March 31, 2021

Monkey Mania

#StlZooMonkeyMania continues! Our primate keepers selected eight monkey species to be featured in a friendly online voting competition, and you have helped narrow our species down to the Forest Four. The champion will be featured on our social media and have the Primate House named after them for the day!

Our final match-up in our Forest Four is between the golden lion tamarin and the Geoffrey’s marmoset. 

Which do you feel has the best social/family dynamic?

Golden lion tamarins will eat anything they can find that is smaller than them…so mostly plants, fruits, and a few bugs and lizards. They will share food with each other, even letting the young tamarins playfully steal food from parents and siblings. Don't ask for an invitation to dinner though, because these monkeys only share with other members of their family. 

Vs

Geoffrey’s marmosets live in family groups in the wild, with usually around eight to 10 members. What's cool about their social group is that they almost always have fraternal twins, and for the first week after they are born, the father is the only family member that carries the babies. After that, everyone helps care for the babies, with dad still being the main carrier. Older siblings learn how to care for their potential future babies this way.  

Make your selection at Facebook.com/stlzoo  

Photos: Ethan Riepl

Mississippi River Plastic Pollution Initiative

Recently, the Saint Louis Zoo became a partner organization with the Mississippi River Plastic Pollution Initiative. The goal of the pilot phase of this initiative is to collect data along the upper, middle and lower Mississippi River. The data is being gathered using a “community science” approach, which means data may be submitted by members of the public. Data will be analyzed to understand the state of plastic litter along the river’s banks. If you would like to participate in the data collection, visit the link below for more information about the initiative and how to download the Marine Debris Tracker. 

unep.org/regions/north-america/regional-initiatives/mississippi-river-plastic-pollution-initiative