2019: The Year in Animal Care – Herpetarium

January 15, 2020

Animal care is at the heart of what we do every day at the Zoo. Our curators and zoological managers from each animal unit selected their favorite 2019 accomplishment for animal care.
 
The Herpetarium had a great year in 2019! The Herpetarium staff successfully reproduced Ocellete mountain vipers, Lake Titicaca frogs, the Rio Pescado stubfoot toad, Armenian vipers, Tokar habus and Ozark hellbenders. There are also several new exhibits at the Herpetarium that opened in 2019, two of which are the new habitat for shingleback skinks and the recently renovated puff adder habitat.
 
We celebrated many accomplishments through the Saint Louis Zoo WildCare Institute. Our Zoo acquired several new species of endangered Ecuadorian amphibians as part of the WildCare Institute Center for the Conservation of Ecuadorian Herpetofauna. Four of these species can be seen at the Herpetarium. We hatched over 700 hellbenders and released over 1,300 back into rivers in Missouri as part of the Ron Goellner Center for Hellbender Conservation, part of the WildCare Institute. In addition, the WildCare Institute Center for Conservation in Western Asia celebrated the grand opening of the Armenian Conservation Breeding Center, which is focused on helping reptiles and amphibians on the brink of extinction in Armenia.

2019: The Year in Animal Care – Birds

2019: The Year in Animal Care – Red Rocks

2019: The Year in Animal Care – Birds

January 09, 2020

Animal care is at the heart of what we do every day at the Zoo. Our curators and zoological managers from each animal unit selected their favorite 2019 accomplishment for animal care.

In 2019, the Bird staff had several notable hatches and training successes.

We successfully fledged four Guam kingfisher chicks. This species is extinct in the wild and is supported only in the care of zoos like the Saint Louis Zoo.

We also had a successful pair of puffin foster parents at Penguin & Puffin Coast. A horned puffin chick was raised by a pair of tufted puffins and was the first offspring fledged from the horned puffin biological parents.

Our cinereous vulture pair is being trained to target, station and move into a large crate voluntarily. This training makes weighing the birds and occasional vet checks safer and less stressful for them. We are also participating in a multi-zoo hormone study for cinereous vultures. This data will help tell us more about hormone fluctuations leading up to egg lay, and it will hopefully increase breeding success of this near-threatened species. - Amanda Hausman, Zoological Manager of Birds

 

2019: The Year In Animal Care – Red Rocks

January 07, 2020

Animal care is at the heart of what we do every day at the Zoo. Our curators and zoological managers from each animal unit selected their favorite 2019 accomplishment for animal care.

The Antelope team’s vision is “saving species, one ungulate at a time.” In 2019, we moved the needle toward this goal by celebrating 21 births from nine different species.

The Saint Louis Zoo has a long commitment to the sustainability of ungulates (animals with hooves). Currently, every mammal species in Red Rocks is part of an Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) Species Survival Plan (SSP).

A female Chinese goral born in April 2019 was the first goral born at the Zoo in 19 years. This birth was a significant contribution to the North American population of Chinese goral, which only totals 25 animals.

Several members of our team also serve as SSP coordinators and Steering Committee members on AZA Taxon Advisory Groups to ensure that we have healthy populations of ungulates in the future. - Tim Thier, Acting Curator of Ungulates