FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Aug. 20, 2015

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION:
Saint Louis Zoo 314/781-0900
Susan Gallagher, 314/646-4633; Gallagher@stlzoo.org
Christy Childs, 314/646-4639; Childs@stlzoo.org
Joanna Hoeltge, 314/646-4703; Bender@stlzoo.org

First Ever Hatch of Horned Guan Chicks at Saint Louis Zoo

This critically endangered species has been bred only one other time in the U.S.

The Saint Louis Zoo today announced that two critically endangered horned guan chicks [pronounced gwahn] hatched at the Zoo on Friday, Aug. 7—the first for the Zoo and only the second recorded breeding of the species in the United States.

Since these are the first offspring for the inexperienced parents, the chicks are being hand-raised behind the scenes in a private area of the Bird House.

At almost 2 weeks old, the chicks weigh 5 ounces, stand about 8 inches tall and have fuzzy brown and black downy feathers. Their unique horns will start to develop at approximately 3 months of age. The horn begins with two bumps on the top of the head. These bumps gradually twist and grow together.

One of the rarest bird species in the world, the horned guan population in the wild is down to only 1,000 to 2,000 individuals in southeastern Mexico and Guatemala because their cloud forest habitat has been destroyed for logging, coffee plantations and other cash crops.

"This hatching is an important development in what has been a great effort to save this species; it was the result of many years of hard work," said Jeffrey P. Bonner, Dana Brown President and Chief Executive Officer at the Saint Louis Zoo. "It took great attention to the welfare of the parents and enormous patience and persistence from Bird Curator Michael Macek, Zoological Manager Anne Tieber and the keeper staff at the Bird House, especially Jenny James and Sydney Oliveira, to make this happen."

The parents of the two chicks are a male, age 12, who arrived at the Zoo nine years ago and a female, 7, who arrived five years ago. On view at the Zoo's Bird House are the parents and a third adult female, also age 7. All came from the Cloud Forest Ambassadors Program at the Africam Safari Zoo in Puebla, Mexico, where they hatched. In 2007, the Saint Louis Zoo became the first accredited zoo in the nation to exhibit this species. Currently 56 horned guans are found in five institutions primarily in Mexico.

Large and dramatic, the horned guan (or pavon) has a unique two-inch-long red horn of bare skin extending from the top of its head. This horn is thought to be ornamental to attract a mate. It has a bright white chest laced with fine lines of black feathers and a body covered with a jet black plumage that shines an iridescent blue in the sun. They are about the size of a small turkey and are arboreal, rarely coming to the ground in their native mountain forests. Horned guans are related to some of the most endangered birds in the world—curassows, guans and chachalacas.

The Saint Louis Zoo began working intensively with other species of guans in 1997, when it received a $25,000 Institute of Museum Services grant to investigate artificial insemination techniques in this highly endangered group of birds. The Zoo was also the location for the first ever hatching of a chick—a common piping guan—from the artificial insemination of a cracid species. Cracids are a family of game birds, like the horned guan, that are found predominantly throughout the Latin American tropics.

Since then, the Zoo has worked with this endangered family of birds in Trinidad and Columbia and, in 2004, founded the WildCare Institute and the Center for Conservation of the Horned Guan. The Horned Guan Conservation Center staff has worked for a decade with its partners to conduct research on this elusive species. The complex dynamics of seed dispersal and habitat utilization are little understood.

The Center also is encouraging improved habitat management—advocating for increasing the protected area that is home to the horned guan and working to limit the factors that threaten vulnerable wildlife in this area. In addition, the Center has initiated a local education program to teach local communities how to farm in more habitat-friendly ways and to strengthen community conservation participation.

"These programs, coupled with enforcement action, are expected to help reduce the threats caused by illegal timber removal and hunting," said Center Director Michael Macek. "There is hope for this species thanks to efforts to reduce coffee plantations and to form additional reserves that can provide potential for eco-tourism, resulting in alternative economic opportunities for local communities."

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About Saint Louis Zoo: Named America's #1 Zoo by Zagat Suvey and Parenting Magazine, the Saint Louis Zoo is widely recognized for its innovative approaches to animal management, wildlife conservation, research and education. One of the few free zoos in the nation, it attracts about 3,000,000 visitors a year. www.stlzoo.org

About the WildCare Institute Center for Conservation of the Horned Guan (Pavon) in Mexico: The Horned Guan Conservation Center serves as the leading U.S. organization dedicated to the conservation of the pavon and its habitat. The center works to accomplish this through research management, habitat management, limiting factors management, life histories studies and reintroduction as recommended by the 2002 Population and Habitat Viability Assessment (PHVA). The 1995 Conservation Assessment and Management Plan (CAMP) also recommends a level 1 captive breeding program as a conservation component. www.stlzoo.org/wildcare.